Output (writing and speaking) has an important role to play in courses centered on comprehensible input. learn more about its role here!

Output

One common question that I was asked in my sessions at iFLT '14 was, "I thought that our goal is to provide students with comprehensible input...so why do so many of these activities contain output?" Great question! Is output bad? No comprehension based teacher thinks that output is bad. Output is a good thing and one of the end … Continue reading Output

CCSS Aligned L2 Reading Comprehension Questions

About two months ago, I wrote a post explaining how second language teachers can use the Common Core Anchor Standards for Reading to give depth to their reading assessments and challenge students to think critically in the target language. Read it here. Understandably, some readers were left wondering what an assessment composed of CCSS Aligned questions … Continue reading CCSS Aligned L2 Reading Comprehension Questions

Quick comprehension checks that you can use in language classrooms to ensure that students are picking up what you're putting down

Comprehension Checks

Note: Much of my knowledge about comprehension checks has come from Betsy Paskvan, a Japanese teacher here in Anchorage, AK. Betsy has presented many times on checking for comprehension at state and national language conferences (she'll be at NTPRS this summer), and she often travels to other school districts to offer them professional development on comprehension checks … Continue reading Comprehension Checks

REALLY assess reading comprehension

Scott Benedict is the king of assessment, so if you have never before pondered accurate assessment, standards-based assessment, etc., you should probably hop on over to his site, Teach for June, and spend the next few weeks there before you come back and finish reading this post. If you have already reached the conclusion that it … Continue reading REALLY assess reading comprehension

What did I say?

A good teacher is always looking for ways to vary his or her assessments. Administering varied assessment types allows for differences in student strengths and weaknesses and provides novelty. Novelty is important because it makes the assessment feel less like an exam and more like an activity, which reduces anxiety and lowers the affective filter, … Continue reading What did I say?